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and they get familiar with them. that's what they use. they resist change and coordination. they resist trying to work together and that is the fundamental problem we have. >> we tried to switch off occasionally. i think one of the other issues i wanted to ask about was counseling because the coordination program as well as the transition gps program that the president has proposed and we are moving forward on call for the counselors and we know the problems and mental health, but how are we planning for the kind of counselors agree to be needed for this? because clearly they have to be cross trained in many ways understanding both systems as well as small business, etc.. how are we planning for the emerging of these kind of folks that are going to be critical to this but we don't have them in any great number. >> that, i think is the key to making this transition work is to have the counselors that are familiar both with veterans and the defense areas. what are the benefits, what are the opportunities that are available and be able to present that. so it is going to take some training of the
have given us arab awaking 101, 201 and 301. >> next, steve ratner talks about addressing the fiscal cliff. of he was joined by the state department's chief economist at the world affairs council to talk about president obama's second term and policy changes ahead. this is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much for that introduction. lori has said to me that since we started a bit late, provided it's okay with our speakers, we'll run a little built late, maybe five or ten after two. i'm going to ask them questions for about 40 minutes and then throw the floor open to you. so get your notebooks out and your questions, you can grill them in a moment. before starting, lori asked me to set the frame a little bit and to talk just for a moment about the u.s. competitiveness and the u.s. economy in a global context. and their actually was an oecd report that came out this morning that does that admirably. this report predicts that within four years, by 2016, the chinese economy will be bigger than the economy. and what the oecd report sort of further says, it's a great report. if
u.s. ambassador to pakistan the ambassador to the united states and former adviser to hillary clinton. hosted by the world affairs council of america, this is 45 minutes. [applause] >> is a great pleasure to be here with such a great panel, three ambassadors and one globally renowned journalist and scholars. so i've been told there have been a lot of questions about pakistan and afghanistan so far and i think we have a first-rate panel to start dealing with them. what i'm going to do in terms of focusing the discussion is i'm going to key off with questions to each of our panelists, one each and allow for a little bit of follow up and then i will open the floor to use and you will have more time to engage with them. let me begin with ambassador munter. you already got his bio, but i think in some ways he is almost uniquely positioned to provide us a very recent perspective on what pakistan looks like in the united states to official american advisers and diplomats and also the u.s. pakistan relationship during what was an exceedingly difficult and trying time which is no refle
the synergy that is gained of all the services in order for us, nor to meet our nation's needs and the synergy and balance necessary to move forward and it limits the new strategy. one of the issues i have come when people do an evaluation of the army, look at brigade combat team, how many brigade combat team compounded when you for the future. that's important to that's fundamental to what we do. however, people tend to forget many other parts about the army that is so critical to us supporting the joint force. first, 75% of the operational forces special operations forces is army. can't forget about that. we are responsive camera to make sure we stay responsive to civil authorities and for the example we continue to make sure we have the right capability to respond to wildfires, hurricane relief, and as you see what's going on today up in the northeast. we provide a broad range of essential services today to combat and commanders that includes intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance for all the geographic combatant commanders. we provide air and missile defense to all geographical combata
before we did the plan, the u.s. was a system of mexico with $36 million. here we are, this neighbor that's so important to us, we're assisting. at the same time, the united states will give 25 #% of all the foreign aid that we do, a lot of money. israel, egypt, pakistan, iraq, and afghanistan. nothing wrong with that, but we have to work with our frens to the south. we put in 1.4, and with additional money, it's $1.9 billion. for every one dollar we help with mexico, they spend $13. they spend a lot of money on security. they got to -- we got to understand what they are doing. now, what we started off, we did the easy thing, buy them hell cometters, buying this, and e worked with george bush, and filed the first legislation before bush talked about the plan because i felt that strongly about helping mexico, but nevertheless, we worked together. we did the easy thing with mexico, the helicopters and the planes. the hard part is this is we got to start training or billing the capacity, the prison systems, the prosecutors, the policemen. we're working on it at the federa
excellent idea. unfortunately, only one-third of that is going to be used. so $200 million is going to go unspent that can go out and serve unserved america today. the same issue will be in front of us in 2013. that's what windstream's waiver is all about, is there other ways to think about this other than setting the 775 limit. and beyond that i think getting on to the model that we need going forward for universal service funding. the industry, the usta has put forth a model, but the fcc has to come up with their own model which will drive caf ii is what we're calling it, the connect america fund 2, so that's where the biggest bang for the buck will be in our business. because remember, as we looked at these more than minor changes in the financials of the telephone companies across the country, it was so important that we do these two things coincidentally. we kind of got a little bit out of sync. we've gotten one done very effectively, efficiently and fast. it's happen realtime, it's showing up in the numbers today, we've just got to work this usf thing out x it's about the cons
fulfilling the commitment to us. of course, our thoughts and prayers are with you, governor, and your family. he is a governor dedicated to his people, to the rule of law, and to the future of the united states of america, and we're very pleased and honored to have him here with us today, governor rick scott. [applause] >> good morning. thank you for the introduction. the -- it's great to be here, i want to introduce you to a couple people. this is my wife, ann, married since we were 19 years old. we've been very fortunate. [applause] she makes sure if i say anything, she corrects it, he didn't really say that. she does communications. [applause] [laughter] and then my general council, and he's done a great job. [applause] so ten days after a long and con contentious presidential election, it seems our whole political system has become a constant campaign. one election barely seems to end before in the middle of another one. there is virtually no breaking in between. that leaves us tiredded and a little aggravated. a break is especially important in between elections because elections are ab
in the southwest, been in the u.s. since the was basically took half of mexico. and the new latino population which is foreign-born, 40% foreign-born, and the rest of the children of immigrants. very conservative. i know when asked about government they may give answers that are not extraordinary, but sometimes we get tangled, caught up with polls. resort have seen in this election cycle. and i think with latinos we cite polling with specific issues but is that a better understanding of where they're coming from you will get an understanding of why they're answering the questions that way. but i believe with the latino community, we lost the latino vote because of immigration. if we would have a better position on immigration, from the get-go, from the primary governor romney would've been competitive and it would've been competitive in those battleground states where the latino vote was decisive. and, finally, we have to stop being rockefeller republicans. we are not the party of the 47%. you know, when governor romney said what he did last week that obama won because it gives to latinos and other
-- there are so many things that are on the brink of taking us on the disaster not the least of them being the possibility of cyber warfare. that's something that television news ought to be covering big time right now. i am tremendously concerned by the fact that the american public and its military have never been as far apart as they are right now. a terrific job of covering everyone in uniform and hero. we did a terrific job of welcoming them at airports saying thank you for your service. we know nothing about what's going on in the military and for what's more, the military operations these days are being launched on the basis of drone attacks, cia operatives, special operations forces out in the field, and all of that backed by civilian employees, civilian contractors, and we know next to nothing that is brought by these. islamic because the reporting is not being done? >> it's because we found that keeping the american public won't stand for a draft and the professional military wasn't enough to fight all over the world else we are now -- we've been focused on afghanistan we actuall
realize is that there's something very exciting going on in what you used to be hard to do stuff. .. >> recognize a a regular guy can compete with aerospace industry using the open source hardware, software, readily acceptable technology. i felt that show is what i saw the first web browser. when i realized the concept of publishing and putting things on the internet weren't -- was no easy we realize the moment something broadcast and publishing it was a matter of point* and click. that moment is when it just happened to. then we got the 3-d printer. you may be familiar with them but what takes pixels line york screened that is how it is looked at. and you hold it in your hand and then has more layers. that builds up things out of plastic. we got one by a children grow up with the 3-d printer they think anything they can draw upon the screen and that we don't have enough color or. [laughter] but not all children but they shot come. that is also of democratization moment. once you have seen and recognized the technology used to be expensive this cheap and easy introducing words li
february, which is pertinent because he made an important point. he said, maybe you can even use the word. the arab spring will come to china? i think we should be quite self-confident, not overconfident, but i think we have a sustainable model and then much less certain that china has at this point a truly sustainable model. so that's not really my worry from a european point of view. my worry is a different worry. i worry as we look at these global challenges that paula mentioned from terrorism to piracy to proliferation, it better, et cetera, our ability to create and maintain a functioning system of global government -- governance appears to have declined. our ability to have a working system of global governance. when i look at what's going on this area, to u.n. security council is dysfunctional, not working, not capable of coming to a conclusion. the g20 has not fulfilled, at least not according to me, the expectations we had when this larger body was created. in other words, from a european point of view, you need to worry about the fact that europe will have obviously a smaller po
rights all the time. in our state i want to have honest, fair elections. if you are not u.s. citizen you don't have the right to vote in our state. there was a federal database called save our homeland security we asked for that we as taxpayers paid for the we have a right to end it -- that wouldn't give it to us so we ended up in a lawsuit and we won. we won because we are on the right side. we have to look at every day about our own state sovereignty and what our own rights are. goes back to the alexander hamilton quote. for all of us is individuals weathered is economic freedom or just freedom to live our lives the way we want to we have got to focus on states rights because if we don't and the federal government will run everything about our lives. let me thank you for the opportunity to be here, thank you for what you do every day. have a great day. >> the u.s. constitution and to screen court republican senator mike lee of utah and ted crews of texas. this is about an hour. >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. our mid afternoon session. good afternoon. my name is leonard leo an
. for more information visit texasbookfestival.org. >> tell us when you think of your programming this weekend. comment on our facebook call or send us an e-mail. nonfiction books every weekend on c-span2. >> next, chrystia freeland talked about a rise of the superrich, the.-- the top 0.one% of the population and the impact they have in the world. this is hosted by politics and prose bookstore in washington d.c. and it is about an hour. [applause] >> thanks a lot. sorry to keep everyone waiting. i will say a few things about what is in the book. as i have been doing some interviews with my book, a favored way of interviewers in the conversation is to save the rich have always been with us after all. actually, that is not true. one of the points, the starting point of my book is to say actually things are different now. we really need to be aware of this new political and economic reality that incoming quality has grown hugely in the united states and the industrialized world and around the world and a lot of the action is at the very top -- is that better? i am so short i have to
people were very strategic in their use of their resources. and they had a lot. obama raised about a billion dollars. they were very strategic. obama's campaign can buy a television advertisement at the lowest rate possible, whereas the television stations, local television stations that are selling that want to make as much money as possible and they don't have to offer low rate to the super pacs. they can charge the super pac as much as the market will bear and in fact because of the saturation, and they in fact did say that many were paying 10 or 15 times more for 30 seconds in the obama campaign was. so i don't want to say that -- it would be satisfying to say money didn't have any effect, so despite the billions that report and the people trying to manipulate elections or even worse, another aspect of the citizens united campaign was an employer received both the sample ballot to his workers paychecks. so they would get an idea of how you wanted them to vote. there were a lot of employers who did that. but romney encouraged employers to do that. in terms of citizens united, fi
. you have been quoted as saying that there are very likely as many or more spies working against u.s. interests inside the u.s. during the cold war, which was a head snapping quote when i read it. who are these people and what are they after? >> i don't know that. i've been on the government for six years, but if you look at the value of intelligence, importance of intelligence in the expenditures of resources by china, by russia, but others and look for them is one of the biggest is. well it's the u.s. not only national security secrets, the commercial seats as be of much of can be gleaned or stolen from cyberspace. it is a dire threat in part because we shifted so much attention, so much resource and the counterterrorism arena we've forgotten the necessity of old-fashioned counterintelligence and that's an important element of this. >> often i've heard some people involved in counterintelligence tends to be seen as the redheaded stepchild of the intelligence world. why is that when we need it and what is the cure for a? effect in part because it's something we don't want to think a
who mentioned this to me as us going out the door last night, we had three major house special elections over the last couple of years. one in pennsylvania, mark critz one that when. one in new york when chris lee, he is sending videos or photographs of his shortlist top left office in upstate new york, was replaced by the democrat kathy hogle. and the third, when arizona seat open up after congressman giffords stepped down after the horrible shooting. she was replaced by congressman barber. the democrats won all three of those special elections, and each and every case they said they won because of medicare. did somebody say medicare? at what was, medicare. and then what the democrats had was, and we're going to use that as a template for winning in the twinkling election. didn't work at the congressional -- 2012 election. women look at the exit polls and we see why people voted and how they voted, sometimes it's not so civil. the exit polls have some very strange results. i'll get into a couple of these. is the country had in the right direction or sears off on the wrong trac
times what the rest of public education costs. and many, and the vast majority of our basis we use public schools. we could take the money we're spending today, pay every public school system 14,000 per child, and save billions of dollars per year just on, and with the same or better outcomes. >> this weekend talk with oklahoma senator tom coburn about the fiscal cliff, the affordable care act and the future of the republican party on "book tv"'s in depth. the senator written several books and reports including the latest, the debt bomb. join the conversation with calls, e-mails and tweets comements and for doctor, senator tom coy burn. sunday noon eastern on "book tv"'s in depth on c-span2. >>> up next, for-profit practitioners discuss the role of private enterprise in public education. they lose also look at the obama administration approach to education reform. that was hosted yesterday at the american enterprise institute in washington. it is 90 minutes. >> hi. welcome, thanks for joining us. whether you're here at home, hope everybody had a terrific thanksgiving. i know that w
candidates for u.s. senate. rick berg and heidi heitkamp. i'm stacy sturm with the league of women voters, and i will be your moderator this evening. joining me on the panel is the special sections editor for the bismarck tribune and lawrence king, an attorney and also a member of the bismarck school board. this evening's debate takes place at horizon middle school in bismarck and has been organized by the league of women voters. it's co-sponsored by dakota media access and the bismarck tribune. the league of women voters is a nonpartisan organization and promotes the informed participation of all citizens in their government. this is intended to be a respectful exchange of ideas. our purpose this evening is to provide voters with information about the candidates and their positions on the issues that affect the people of north dakota. the audience here tonight is asked to, please, reserve applause or any reaction or comments until the forum has ended. tonight's debate forum will be as follows: each candidate will have 90 seconds to respond to each question. following responses to the que
after all here today have. forgotten. fate looked down kindly on us when she chose neil to be the first to venture to another world. to have the opportunity to look back from space at the beauty of our own. it could have been another.ow it wasn't. it wasn't for a reason. no one, no one, but no one could have accepted the responsibility of his remarkable accomplishment with more dignity and more grace than neil armstrong. he embodied all that is good and all that is great about america. >>> more from the memorial service for neil armstrong thanksgiving day on c-span at 10 oom eastern and just before 11:30, a behind the scenes look at life as a teenager in the white house with susan ford baal and lyndon johnson rob, and after one, how scientists use game skills and theories to solve world problems. >>> a conversation with president obama's biographers after his re-election. hear from journalists ron suskind, author of "the confidence men: wall street, washington, and the education of a president." the atlantic, aspen institute, and the newseum hosted the forum. >> we have one titled "why
provide that 5 million jobs in the u.s., and they tend to -- your story aside they tend to be fairly high jobs, relatively high-paying jobs. they tend to be weighted towards the manufacturing sector, and so to the extent that we haven't really on the national scale at least at the federal government level, come up with a systematic way of trying to promote ourselves as a destination and there are certainly a lot of reasons beyond the cost of labor companies look to invest here and that has to do with education level, it has to do with putting the challenges aside some of the top educational institutions in the world. we have a legal system that protect investor rights, we have intellectual property rights that are very robust so there are other reasons companies look to invest and that's something we are trying to encourage around the world. the title of this is dillinger and opportunities and i think you leave out some of the challenges very well. one of the great opportunities and we don't know what the scale or the scope will be with shale gas and what we might see in the coming decade
. everybody is running to the thompson reuters counter. thank you for joining us. great to be with you. i am steve -- steve clemons, editor of large of the atlantic, i want to compliment the museum and tell you how historic this is. this is a jam packed day. the google party is coming up, this is one of three times in the history of the museum that they have allowed an outside group, the other happened to be the president of the united states and madeleine albright when she was secretary of state, this is the third time for a during the day session here, this is a great partnership. i think the -- i have a friend here, allen was the founder of circuit city, just apparently wrote the rise and fall of circuit city and to some degree they are uncomfortable truths, when you think of nations and companies, there are rise and fall stories and the united states is so clean not on the fall side but political campaigns are a lousy time to think about the truth of what is happening. one of the hard truths, there were five white guys, we tried to figure out, tall guys and doug and we are very well awar
doesn't have that skill set to use human nature as a way of getting done what he wants to get done in washington. >> host: holm books have you written? >> guest: i think this is my 11th book. three novels and eight nonfiction. >> host: what do you say to critics of your books? >> guest: what do the critics say. >> host: the accuracy of the stories you tell, et cetera. >> guest: well, the fact of the matter is, as far as i know, there hasn't been a single fact in this book that's been challenged in a kind of credible way. people have said, oh, klein makes things up. that's what kids in the schoolyard -- they call each other names. i've been called all kinds of names. but in fact when it comes to the credibility of my reporting, i don't think anybody has laid a glove on me yet. >> host: how many university were you editor. >> guest: 12 years assed debtor in chief of "new york times." and many of my. columns have been used by vanity fair, and all the books that have been excerpted, not a single nonfactual issue was wrong. >> host: you interviewed -- >> guest: we sat down for three hou
, and they can, perhaps, enlighten us on what went right and wrong. obviously, it was not all hunky dory. many people lost power. is that something that could not be prevented? is it something that if we change certain things might be prevented in the future? you know, last summer a storm knockedded out 9-1-1 on the east coast. it's becoming more and more common place. a hearing would allow us to invest gait the reliability of the networks and identify and highlight best practices, and when necessary, address as a -- vulnerabilities in the infrastructure. i want to hear what the telecommunications industry has to say, and they can help enlighten congress as to what we should be doing to prevent this from happening in the future. >> host: representative engel, have you heard back from chairman upton? >> caller: we have not, but the letter was just recently sent out to chairman upton and the chairman of the subcommittee. this hearing, this proposed hearing is, again, not to be at adversary yal in any way, shape, or form. it should be bipartisan. we want to find out what happened, and i don't thi
that got us into that mess, sending one of them to washington dc. >> moderator: thank you. king: olympia snowe left because she wanted to spend more time with her family, she left because she said the place and in function and she couldn't get anything done. she was utterly frustrated. i believe that we have to try to do something different in order to respond to that challenge, and that's why i am running for the united states senate as an independent. this makes a real difference in peoples people's lives. this isn't about processes. this is about solving the problems that the nation faces. for example, there was a bill before the senate that would have benefited veterans across the country and it was filibustered because the party in the senate -- they didn't want the president have a victory before the election. that is a terrible way to make decisions. the concern should have been for the veterans and not for the politics. >> moderator: thank you. summers: we are spending a trillion dollars a year year more than we take in and that is simply unsustainable. i want to go to washington
injuring himself into a program at walter reed what it ended up using acupuncture, using meditation, using other techniques to wean him off of all the drugs that he was on, and through this program he actually was able to walk out of walter reed on his own two feet. so, you know, i really commend the military for two things, for one, for allowing us to tell this story, both good and bad, but for recognizing this problem by recognizing that there is this problem of overmedication and that they are looking for outside the box ideas and how to fix it. i mean, that's sort of the whole thesis of the film really, the metaphor of "escape fire" is the status quo isn't working and we need to start looking for outside the box ideas. >> more with matthew heineman, producer and director of "escape fire," the fight to rescue america's health care. sunday night at eight on c-span's q&a. >> live picture from the bipartisan policy center here in washington, d.c., a discussion just getting underway with political analysts and pollsters taking a look at the election numbers and examining a voter turnout and
taxes now, that is not going to play in my judgment with any of us. we are not for raising revenue paid, certainly. second, remember we're at the 18 months ago we passed the debt ceiling increase, and now it's time to do the second debt ceiling increase? we're just a couple months away from having to go to that debate again, and we get to do any of the promise cuts from the 115 months ago. so where are those? this idea that race accident, we promise we'll get to the cuts, now we promise we'll get to the customer american people are saying are you serious? i think is really problematic. >> let's understand the big picture here, and the presence of philosophy. i've been watching, i remember him looking us in the eye the date was february 10, 2009 when he was selling his economic stimulus plan, and he said fdr's new deal actually did work but he should've spent a lot more money and then the records would've shown it. it seemed to me he was looking at writing of unexplained, he convinced me that he is a keynesian economist on steroids. when i look at this sequestration deal, and the fiscal
are on the air. go ahead. >> caller: yes i would first like to congratulate the american people on using good sense by reelecting a president. mr. romney had no plans. he was just offering the opposite of what the president was presenting to the american people. have no plan for anything. i don't know how anybody in his position could get as far as he did with nothing to offer the american people. the other thing -- i just don't understand how with the american people would think to even consider him as the presidential candidate. he had absolutely nothing to offer. everything he offered was nonexistent or i will just do the president isn't doing. >> host: but the ask you, you sound like you're passionately supportive of the president. >> caller: i'm passionate for the country. i don't care who obama our romney is. i want somebody that will help the american people to progress. i want to see america -- >> host: you want compromise? >> caller: i want compromise, yes. but i'm going to tell you this, and make no mistake about it, we have people in this country that have completely destroyed rath
on earth are we ever going to do so? so we see this is very as very important for the reelected u.s. administration and yes, he is right about the icc. that is what we are saying. we are not saying that anyone should he exempt from the icc for the long-term future. the negotiation has to succeed and everybody has to accept some things that are temporary or that are unpleasant. we have our own experience of that. many honorable members with the violent peace process. we had to do things that we were very reluctant to do but necessary to bring about a settlement. that is true in the middle east as well. schmidt are alumni along with joe biden. [applause] along with joe biden who has just been elected for a second term as vice president of the united states. [applause] together, they are the reason the university of delaware has been called the epicenter of politics. and since then another alumnist governor chris christie of new jersey has demonstrated his brand of politics based on reality whether than wishful thinking. he embraced president obama after hurricane sandy to the dismay o
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